This Mom Will Inspire YOU to Celebrate Your Post-Baby Body!

This Mom Will Inspire YOU to Celebrate Your Post-Baby Body!
news.com.au

There’s an Australian blogger who’s been making headlines in the media world, and we couldn’t be happier for her! It’s not because of some celebrity gossip or a DIY tip. It’s because she is boldly---and beautifully---showing off her post-baby body.

As a mother of two (two kids under 2, at that!) Laura Mazza has been sharing before and after pics. Shots of what she looked like when she obsessed over her body prior to conceiving and what she looks like now that her babies are here.

"Stretch marks. A droopy belly button. Thicker, not many bones protruding, but more dimples that represent cellulite. People don't want to see this photo. All of a sudden [it's] not okay. It's not pleasing to the eye anymore. It's not a body to be admired.”

Lazza goes on to share that as she was working to look like she did prior to her pregnancy, she wasn’t very happy. "But still I looked at this photo, this image of myself, like I was fat," Mazza says. "There was nothing wrong with the way I looked. My body was mine." 

She’s right. And inspiring.

If you are a new mom with baby weight and it’s got you feeling some type of way, think of what Mazza said and read what we have to say about it too. A woman who can carry and (whew!) deliver a baby is a BOSS! And that automatically makes her one of the most beautiful women on the planet. No matter what her size is!

You’re a woman. Not a Barbie doll.

If you do some digging around, apparently the average size of a woman (in America) is around 14. So already that should put your mind at ease before, during and following your pregnancy. But even if you are larger than that, especially during the first six months after having your baby, go easy on yourself. Women have babies. Barbie dolls are for play time. For the record, if you really look hard at them, they look anatomically creepy anyway.

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